Home | Contact |

40 connected

Home / Contact
Home / Contact
Paypal/ Card USD / EUR

EARN MONEY with Offers,Tasks & Surveys

Diamond Painting
Diamond Painting Info
Diamond Painting Kits

Charts

6 € /7 USD Charts / 2
Stitch pattern from photo


Articles
Articles


Email updates
Get updates by email:
Shops and distributors
UK Webshops
US Shops / 2
US Retailers / 2  
Distributors / DS2

Designer Links
Designer Links
/ 2
Scrapbooking designers

Charts and Kits
Cross Stitch Designers
C/Stitch Kit Shops
Free Cross Stitch Patterns
Mirabilia Kits / 2 / 3
Mirabilia Corrections
Lavender & Lace
Dimensions Kits / 2 / 3 / 4

Christmas Kits
Sewing Kits
Heaven & Earth Kits
Needlepoint Kits
Told in a Garden
Tobin Kits / 2
Mill Hill Kits
Vervaco Kits / 2 / 3
Candamar Kits / 2 / 3
Plastic Canvas Kits / 2 / 3
Imaginating Charts / 2 / 3 / 4
Janlynn Kits / 2 / 3
Riolis Kits / 2 / 3
RTO Kits / 2
Passione Ricamo / Free
Nora Corbett / 2
Butternut Road

Cross stitch fabrics
Aida, lugana, zweigart
Aida Fabric
Best Aida Fabric Brand
More Cross Stitch Fabrics
Aida, Evenweave, Lugana, Linen
Aida & Other fabrics
Cross Stitch Fabrics / 2

Permin

Information / Articles
Cross Stitch Articles
Cross Stitch Charts
Cross Stitch Tips /2 /3 /4
Cross Stitch Stores
DMC Embroidery Threads
Embroidery Threads
Embroidery Stitches
Cross Stitch Helpful Hints
C/Stitch For Beginners
C/Stitch Videotutorials
C/Stitch Videotutorials 2
History of Cross Stitch
How To C/Stitch /2 /3 /4 /5 /6 /7
How To C/Stitch 8 /9 /10 /11 /12 /13
How To C/Stitch 14 /15 /16 /17
How To C/Stitch That WIll Last
How To C/Stitch Over Multiple Threads
How To Make Money With C/Stitch
How Much Money Is Your C/Stitch Worth
Can You Make Money Selling C/Stitch
9 FAQ About Starting a Craft Business
5 Basic Stitches in Cross Stitch
Best Cross Stitch Books / 2
Cross Stitch Glossary /2 /3
Cross Stitch Wikipedia
Cross Stitch Guide
Cross Stitch Equipment /2
C/Stitching on Aida,Evenweave,Linen
Needlework Glossary
65 Cross Stitch Terms
88 Cross Stitch Terms
100 Cross Stitch Terms
20 FAQ About C/Stitch
10 Tips for C/Stitch
15 Hints And Tips
15 Tips And Tricks
Counted C/Stitch Hints
7 Reasons You Need To C/Stitch
Cross Stitch Coupons
Cross Stitch On Waste Canvas
Waste Canvas
Cross Stitch Magazines
What is the Best C/Stitch Brand
How To Use A DMC Color Card
Sewing
Embroidery
Hardanger Embroidery / 2
Needle (Size) Guide / Gd 2
Needles
/ DMC Needles
On Threading a Needle
Handling The Embroidery Thread
Knotting The Thread
Floss &Thread Organization & Storage /2
Scrapbooking
Scrapbooking For Designers
The Embroidery Hoop
Embroidery Hoop or Frame
Magnifiers
Stamps and Stampings
Macramé
Guide To Macramé
Macramé. Video tutorials
Crochet
Crochet Links
Tapestry
Quilting
How to Make A Quilt / 2
Steps To Making A Quilt
Knitting
Hand Dyed Floss

C/Stitch Blogs / Facebook
59 Cross Stitch Blogs
50 Cross Stitch Blogs
40 Cross Stitch Blogs
Cross Stitch on Facebook
Cross Stitch on Instagram

Forums
Crafts and C/Stitch Forums

Applications
23 Best Cross Stitch Apps
13 Mobile Apps for Stitchers

Crafts/Knitting/ Sewing Links
35 Best Craft Sites
24 Best Craft Sites
23 Best Craft Sites
18 Best Craft Sites
85 Best Craft Blogs
50 Best Craft Sites
Craft Books
9 Craft Shops
Crafts Glossary / 2
Craft Info
100 Craft Youtube Channels
100 Craft Youtube Chann. 2
115 Knitting Blogs
40 UK Knitting Blogs
20 Knitting Blogs
110 Sewing Blogs

Other Links

Needlework Fabrics
Needlework
Needlework Frames
Weeks Dye Works Retailers
Needlework Patterns
Sell Your Crafts Online
10 Sites To Start Selling Crafts Online
How To Sell On Etsy /2 /3
/4
Fabric Viewer
Punch Needle for Beginners
Punch Needle FAQ
Punch Needle Tutorial
Wonderfil Eleganza
Eleganza/Cosmo/DMC
CXC Thread Review
Needlepoint vs C/Stitch
Gloriana Shops
Storage & Organization
Eva Rosenstand
Elizabeth Bradley
Sashiko
/2 /3
3 Good Reasons To Try DMC Floche

DMC Info/Charts/Shops
DMC World Shops / 2
Search DMC/Rosace colors
DMC / Rosace Color Card
DMC Color Card (Buy)
DMC Articles (MS Excel)
DMC/Rosace Colors / 2 / 3
Color Description
Color Description 2 / 3
DMC Articles Conversion
DMC-Colbert Wool Convers.
Discontinued DMC Threads
DMC 35 New Colors
Mouline Etoile
Light Effects
Variations / 2
Retors / Satin
Linen / 2
Laine Colbert
Coloris / 2 / 3 / 4 
Pearl Cotton Size 3 / 2
Pearl Cotton Size 5
Pearl Cotton Variations
Pearl Cotton Balls #8 / #12
Cebelia Crochet
Floche
Diamant
Babylo Crochet Yarn
Babylo Crochet Thread
Special Dentelles
Petra
Cebelia Crochet Yarn
Cordonnet Special
Broder Special

Anchor Info/Charts
Anchor Colors / Anchor 2
Anchor Description Colors
Anchor Colors And Names
Pearl Cotton #8 MC
Pearl Cotton #8 Solid
Anchor Marlitt
Anchor Metallic
Tapisserie Wool / 2
Anchor Lame
Anchor Reflecta

M
ore Color Charts / Shops
Madeira
Presencia (Finca) / 2
Caron Collection /2 /3 /4
Caron Hand Dyed VG
Caron Wildflowers / 2
Caron Waterlilies
Caron Watercolors
Classic Colorworks
Crescent (Classic Colorworks)
Crescent Colors / 2
Gloriana Silk Floss
Gloriana All Threads / 2
Gütermann Skala / Mara
Gütermann 2 / Sulky / Tera
Gütermann Sew All
Glissen Gloss Colorwash Silk
Rainbow Gallery Threads
Rainbow Blending Glissen Gloss
Rainbow Gallery
R/Gallery Splendor
R/Gallery Splendor Colors
R/Gallery Wisper / Braid Petite
R/Gallery Treasure Braid 4-8
R/Gallery Treasure B. 12-16
R/Gallery Nordic Gold
R/Gallery Fuzzy Stuff
R/Gallery Silk Lame Braid
Riolis Shops
Sullivans
Threadworx Overdyed
Threadworx Overdyed Floss
Threadworx Overdyed Pearls
Threadworx Quick Reference
Threadworx Charts
Threadworx Designers
Au Ver A Soie / 2
J&P Coats
Dinky Dyes Silk/ Perle 600
Dinky Dyes Perle 1000/ P1900
The Gentle Art Sampler / 2 / 3
The Gentle Art Simply Shaker
The Gentle Art Simply Wool
YLI SR
Cosmo
Madeira
Mettler / Mettler Threads
Mettler (All)
Rasant
Valdani / 2
Venus
Weeks Dye Works
Weeks Dye Works Floss
Puppets Conversion Chart
Aurifil
Panna

Conversion tables
DMC/Rosace-Anchor
Dmc-Anchor & Description
DMC/Anchor Variegated
DMC-Rayon-Anchor Marlitt
DMC-Needlepaints
DMC Light Effects-Kreinik
DMC-Presencia (Finca) / 2
DMC-Venus / 2
DMC-Gamma-Anchor-Madeira
DMC-Needlepoint Silk
DMC-Riolis
DMC-Splendor
DMC-Sullivans
DMC-DFN (Janlynn)
DMC-Mill Hill Beads / 2
DMC-Anchor-Jp-Mill Hill
DMC-Laine Colbert Wool
DMC-Bucilla / 2
DMC-Profilo / 2
DMC-Anchor-Profilo-Ispe
DMC-Cosmo
DMC-Riolis
DMC-Valdani
DMC-Anchor-Yeidami
DMC-The Gentle Art
DMC-Puppets
RGB-DMC
Dimensions-Anchor/DMC /2
Dimensions-DMC/Anchor/JPCoats
Dimensions-DMC / 2
Dome - DMC - Anchor
Eva Rosenstand-DMC
DMC-Au Ver Soie
Crescent Colors-DMC
Anchor-DMC-JPCoats
Anchor Wool-Paternayan-DMC
Anchor-Tapestry Wool-DMC-Wool
E.Bradley-Anchor-DMC-Appletons Tapestry Wool
Anchor-Bucilla
RB Gallery-Kreinik
Kreinik-Treasure Braid
Glissen Gloss RB-Kreinik BF
Weeks Dye-Works-DMC

Kreinik
Distributors & Stores
Kreinik color Charts
Kreinik Widths
Needle Selection Chart
Kreinik colors /2 /3
Kreinik BF / Kreinik #4
Kreinik #8 / Kreinik Silk
Kreinik  #12
Metallic Selection Chart
Kreinik Selection Guides
Braids.Uses And Care
BF.Uses And Care
BF.Secrets
Kreinik How-To
Kreinik Articles

Mill Hill
Mill Hill USA Vendors
Mill Hill Beads
Mill Hill Magnifica
Mill Hill Treasures 1
Mill Hill Treasures 2
Mill Hill Treasures 3
M.Hill.List of colors / 2
Mill Hill colors

Sponsors

Sponsor this site!
contact@mystitchworld.com


Welcome to MyStitchWorld.com. Cross Stitch Distributors


History of Cross Stitch

Source: http://juliesxstitch.com/history-of-cross-stitch




History of Cross Stitch

Cross stitch and needlework can be found in the earliest history, as far back as sixth century BC. Needlework has existed as long as there has been cloth to work it on. Pieces of embroidery and needlework have been found preserved in ancient Egyptian tombs and in Medieval churches all over the world. 

During the Tang Dynasty, cross stitch was popular in China. It is quite likely that it spread west along the Silk Road during this time between 618 to 907 Anno Domini. A females worth was closely tied to her stitching ability in China during this time, as it was her job to sew cloths for her family and her ability to embellish them beautifully was desirable. Floss, made of silk, could be purchased in open markets and was considered a  precocious commodity. Perhaps there were even rudimentary patterns shared between the women of China at this time. As a females writings were often burned as an offering up to her in the after life following her death by her female family and friends, so we may never know. 

In the eleventh century, tapestry was the most popular and famous of embroideries, depicting the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 (Bayeux tapestry). Catherine of Aragon, the daughter of Isabella and Ferdinand of Spain and the first wife of England's Henry the VIII, is credited with bringing blackwork to England in the sixteenth century when she came to marry Henry's older brother, Arthur. Blackwork is believed to be the origins of what we think of as cross stitch today. It was worked with black sheep wool on white linen. Blackwork is still popular today.

The first printed pattern book was made in Germany in 1524. It would be quite some time before patterns became widely available. Printing was invented in the sixteenth century. These early patterns left the stitcher to decide what colors to use for their design.

Linen was extremely expensive, so every square inch of the fabric was used. Thus, the invention of sampler. Samplers were also intended to teach young women to sew, a valuable skill before the industrial revolution, as most women had to make their own clothes and the clothing for their families. Samplers were used as well to teach young girls to memorize their alphabet and numbers. They were also a tool to teach moral values, and to memorize verses from the bible. Since linen was so expensive, commoners used what is called perforated paper to do their designs.

The first fabric made specifically for cross stitch was introduced in 1890 made by a company in Germany called Zweigart. The fabric is called Aida, it is an evenweave and it is designed in little squares making it easy to see where to stitch each cross stitch.

Assisi embroidery is a form of counted-thread embroidery based on an ancient Italian tradition where the background is filled with embroidery stitches and the main motifs are left void (unstitched), similar to a silhouette. The name is derived from the Italian town of Assisi where the modern form of the craft originated. The traditional color used for most designs was red. Green and blue were also very popular colors to use. Traditional themes included animals, plants, and mystical beings like mermaids. Assisi was named after St. Clair of Assisi. St. Francis, the Patron Saint of Needleworkers, was her brother. Redwork is also popular today. 

Zweigart currently has two mills (2015). One in Germany and one in Switzerland. They distribute their products world wide. 

Cross stitch as we know it today was introduced in the 1960s, when women had more leisure time. Needlework in this country has generally been attributed to womens' work, but in its beginnings it was a craft preformed mostly by men who spent many years mastering their technique. Many designs  were made widely available with the ease of printing them and computers to reproduce the designs. You can find a pattern of just about any subject today. You can even design your own patterns with computer software.

Cross stitch is the most popular form of needlework today.  It is very easy to do and to teach. Most people who stitch, myself included, consider it to be relaxing and enjoyable to do. 

There are a few different types of cross stitch including stamped cross stitch. In stamped cross stitch, little Xs are stamped on what is usually a cotton fabric with a tight weave (no holes). The fabric is often used for a quilt, bed linen, or doily. You just stitch over the little X's to make your design.

There is no count cross stitch which is a great way for beginners or children to learn to cross stitch. The pattern is dyed onto the cross stitch fabric (usually an Aida) and you just follow the colors while you stitch. No need for a paper pattern.

More experienced stitchers like to do counted cross stitch. In counted cross stitch you use a clean fabric (Aida, Linen, Lugana, etc.) and you use a paper pattern and follow the directions on the pattern to create your design. This is the most rewarding kind of cross stitch. It's fun to watch your design come alive on a plain piece of fabric as you stitch. It's like painting with a needle.